News

Michigan: school president wasn’t drinking before halftime speech

Michigan: school president wasn’t drinking before halftime speech

SPEECH PROBLEMS: Mary Sue Coleman, seen here during a 2010 press conference, gave an awkward speech during Saturday's football game. Photo: Associated Press

LARRY LAGE, AP Sports Writer

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — The University of Michigan has issued a statement saying school President Mary Sue Coleman had not been drinking alcohol before making remarks at halftime of the football game against Nebraska.

University spokesman Rick Fitzgerald said in a statement Monday morning that the awkward audio was a result of Coleman attempting to slow down her speech because of the significant feedback she was hearing from Michigan Stadium’s public-address system.

Coleman was honored at halftime of Saturday’s game because she is planning to retire in July.

The spokesman says Coleman didn’t have experience using the wireless microphone provided to her and significant wind led to the sound being distorted, delayed and reverberated.

Fitzgerald says Coleman attended non-alcoholic events before the game and hosted one during the game.

Latest Headlines

in Entertainment, Viral Videos

‘Breaking Bad’ stars re-team for hilarious Emmy promo

Fresh
15-overlay7

WATCH: Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul reunited for "Barely Legal Pawn," to promote the upcoming Emmy Awards.

in Sports

Philadelphia girl pitcher becomes Little League’s new ‘phenom’

Fresh
monedavis

Thirteen-year-old Mo'ne Davis is a young ace pitcher exploding on the scene for "throwing like a girl."

in Sports

Wednesday’s Sports Minute

Fresh
nats

Here is the latest sports news making headlines today, Wednesday, Aug. 20.

in Sports

Vikings reach settlement with former punter Kluwe

Fresh
kluwe

Minnesota reached a settlement with former punter Chris Kluwe over his claim that he was released by the team for supporting same-sex marriage.

in Music

Author’s dive into Beatles story still has depths to explore

Fresh
FILE- This is a 1967 handout image from Parlophone of The British group, The Beatles,. From left, are: Ringo Starr, John Lennon, Paul McCartney; and George Harrison. The woman who as a child was the basis for the Beatles song "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" is gravely ill. It was thought by many at the time that the psychedelic song from Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart Club Band was a paean to LSD because of the initials in the title, but it was actually based on a drawing that John Lennon's young son Julian brought home from school. He told his father the drawing was of Lucy in the sky with diamonds. Lucy Vodden, now living in Surrey just outside of London _ drifted apart after schoolyard days, but they have gotten back in touch as Lennon has tried to help Vodden cope with Lupus, a life-threatening disease.

For author Mark Lewisohn, telling the story of the rock band the way it deserves to be told will take time - a quarter-century, to be exact.